Glossary

AJAX progress indicator
Tags: Term Indicator 
  • a

  • ADP National Employment Report
    DEFINITION of 'ADP National Employment Report' A report that measures levels of non-farm private employment. The ADP National Employment Report is based on payroll data from over half of ADP's U.S. business clients. The data represents about 24 million employees from all 19 of the major North(...)
  • ADP Nonfarm Employment Change
    Measures the change in number of employed people during the previous month, excluding the farming industry. ADP, a leading provider of employment solutions for businesses, releases this indicator two days before the official Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) employment report. While the(...)
  • Affiliate Marketing
    Affiliate marketing is a type of performance-based marketing in which a business rewards one or moreaffiliates for each visitor or customer brought by the affiliate's own marketing efforts. The industry has four core players: the merchant (also known as 'retailer' or 'brand'), the network(...)
  • Affiliate Networks
    An affiliate network acts as an intermediary between publishers (affiliates) and merchant affiliate programs. It allows website publishers to more easily find and participate in affiliate programs which are suitable for their website (and thus generate income from those programs), and allows(...)
  • Affiliate Program
    Affiliate marketing is a type of performance-based marketing in which a business rewards one or moreaffiliates for each visitor or customer brought by the affiliate's own marketing efforts. The industry has four core players: the merchant (also known as 'retailer' or 'brand'), the network(...)
  • American Petroleum Institute
    The American Petroleum Institute (API) is the largest U.S trade association for the oil and natural gas industry. It claims to represent about 650 corporations involved in production, refinement, distribution, and many other aspects of the petroleum industry.The association describes its(...)
  • API
    The American Petroleum Institute (API) is the largest U.S trade association for the oil and natural gas industry. It claims to represent about 650 corporations involved in production, refinement, distribution, and many other aspects of the petroleum industry.The association describes its(...)
  • API Weekly Crude Stock
    American Petroleum Institute (API)The American Petroleum Institute reports inventory levels of US crude oil, gasoline and distillates stocks. The figure shows how much oil and product is available in storage.The indicator gives an overview of US petroleum demand. If the increase in crude(...)
  • API Weekly Distillates Stocks
    The American Petroleum Institute reports inventory levels of US crude oil, gasoline and distillates stocks. The figure shows how much oil and product is available in storage.The indicator gives an overview of US petroleum demand.
  • API Weekly Gasoline Stock
    The American Petroleum Institute reports inventory levels of US crude oil, gasoline and distillates stocks. The figure shows how much oil and product is available in storage.The indicator gives an overview of US petroleum demand. If the increase in gasoline inventories is more than expected,(...)
  • b

  • Bailout
    A bailout is a colloquial term for giving financial support to a company or country which faces serious financial difficulty or bankruptcy. It may also be used to allow a failing entity to fail gracefully without spreading contagion.[1] A bailout can, but does not necessarily, avoid an(...)
  • Bank of England
    The Bank of England, formally the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, is the central bank of the United Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based. Established in 1694, it is the second oldest central bank in the world, after the Sveriges Riksbank, and(...)
  • Bank of Japan
    The Bank of Japan (日本銀行 Nippon Ginkō?, BOJ, JASDAQ: 8301) is the central bank of Japan.[1] The Bank is often called Nichigin (日銀?) for short. It has its headquarters in Chūō, Tokyo.[2]
  • Bank Rate
    The central bank is prepared to lend money to its domestic banking system at a certain rate. This rate is called "Bank Rate".
  • Bear Market
    A market characterized by declining prices.
  • Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and a digital payment system[14]:3 invented by an unknown programmer, or a group of programmers, under the name Satoshi Nakamoto.[15] It was released as open-source software in 2009.[16]The system is peer-to-peer, and transactions take place between users(...)
  • BOE
    The Bank of England, formally the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, is the central bank of the United Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based. Established in 1694, it is the second oldest central bank in the world, after the Sveriges Riksbank, and(...)
  • BoJ
    The Bank of Japan (日本銀行 Nippon Ginkō?, BOJ, JASDAQ: 8301) is the central bank of Japan.[1] The Bank is often called Nichigin (日銀?) for short. It has its headquarters in Chūō, Tokyo.[2]
  • Bollinger Bends
    Probably the most well-known indicator that tracks volatility is Bollinger Bands, which were developed in the 1980s by John Bollinger. These are adaptive, meaning that they change (adapt) as volatility changes. Furthermore, they provide us with a relative definition of whether price is(...)
  • Brexit
    Brexit (and its early variant, Brixit),[3] is a portmanteau of "Britain" and "exit". It was derived by analogy from Grexit, referring to a hypothetical withdrawal of Greecefrom the eurozone (and possibly also the EU).[4] The term Brexit may have first been used in reference to a possible UK(...)
  • Broker
    An individual or firm that acts as a mediator, putting together buyers and sellers for a commission. In contrast, a ‘dealer’ commits capital and takes one side of a position, hoping to earn a spread (profit) by closing out the position in a subsequent trade with another party.
  • BTC
    Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and a digital payment system[14]:3 invented by an unknown programmer, or a group of programmers, under the name Satoshi Nakamoto.[15] It was released as open-source software in 2009.[16]The system is peer-to-peer, and transactions take place between users(...)
  • Bull Market
    A market characterized by rising prices.
  • c

  • Certified financial planner
    A certified financial planner (CFP) refers to the certification owned and awarded by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. The CFP designation is awarded to individuals who successfully complete the CFP Board's initial and ongoing certification requirements. Individuals(...)
  • Certified Public Accountant
    Certified Public Accountant (CPA) is a designation given by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants to those who pass an exam and meet work experience requirements.For the most part, the accounting industry is self-regulated. The CPA designation ensures that professional(...)
  • CFP
    A certified financial planner (CFP) refers to the certification owned and awarded by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. The CFP designation is awarded to individuals who successfully complete the CFP Board's initial and ongoing certification requirements. Individuals(...)
  • CGPI
    The Corporate Goods Price Index (CGPI) measures the rate of inflation (i.e., the rate of price changes) experienced by corporations when purchasing goods. A rising trend has a positive effect on the nation's currency because when businesses pay more for goods, they are likely to pass the(...)
  • Claimant Count Change
    Claimant Count Change measures the change in the number of unemployed people in the U.K. during the reported month. A rising trend indicates weakness in the labor market, which has a trickle-down effect on consumer spending and economic growth.
  • Consolidating
    The length while stock or currency prices are less volatile and are shifting sideways.Consolidation generally refers to a pause at some stage in a trend, or even earlier than reversal. it can mirror bulls and bears now not wavering their positions as a result causing prices to transport(...)
  • Consolidation
    The length while stock or currency prices are less volatile and are shifting sideways.Consolidation generally refers to a pause at some stage in a trend, or even earlier than reversal. it can mirror bulls and bears now not wavering their positions as a result causing prices to transport(...)
  • Consumer Price Index
    The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures the rate of inflation (i.e., the rate of price changes) experienced by consumers when purchasing goods and services. A rising trend has a positive effect on the nation's currency. The primary objective of the central bank is to achieve price stability;(...)
  • Corporate Goods Price Index
    The Corporate Goods Price Index (CGPI) measures the rate of inflation (i.e., the rate of price changes) experienced by corporations when purchasing goods. A rising trend has a positive effect on the nation's currency because when businesses pay more for goods, they are likely to pass the(...)
  • Cost per acquisition Commision
    Cost per acquisition (CPA), also known as pay per acquisition (PPA) and cost per conversion, is an online advertising pricing model where the advertiser pays for each specified acquisition - for example, an impression, click, form submit (e.g., contact request, newsletter sign up, registration(...)
  • Cost per conversion
    Cost per acquisition (CPA), also known as pay per acquisition (PPA) and cost per conversion, is an online advertising pricing model where the advertiser pays for each specified acquisition - for example, an impression, click, form submit (e.g., contact request, newsletter sign up, registration(...)
  • CPA
    Certified Public Accountant (CPA) is a designation given by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants to those who pass an exam and meet work experience requirements.For the most part, the accounting industry is self-regulated. The CPA designation ensures that professional(...)
  • CPA Commision
    Cost per acquisition (CPA), also known as pay per acquisition (PPA) and cost per conversion, is an online advertising pricing model where the advertiser pays for each specified acquisition - for example, an impression, click, form submit (e.g., contact request, newsletter sign up, registration(...)
  • CPI
    The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures the rate of inflation (i.e., the rate of price changes) experienced by consumers when purchasing goods and services. A rising trend has a positive effect on the nation's currency. The primary objective of the central bank is to achieve price stability;(...)
  • Crude Oil Inventories
    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Crude Oil Inventories measures the weekly change in the number of barrels of commercial crude oil held by US firms. The level of inventories influences the price of petroleum products, which can have an impact on inflation.If the increase in(...)
  • Cryptocurrency
    A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a digital asset designed to work ashttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptocurrency a medium of exchange using cryptography to secure the transactions and to control the creation of additional units of the currency.[1]Cryptocurrencies are a subset of(...)
  • d

  • Deflation
    In economics, deflation can be described as a decrease in the general price level of goods and services or currency appreciation with respect to the same goods and services.[1] Deflation occurs when the inflation rate falls below 0% (a negative inflation rate). Inflation reduces the real value(...)
  • Depth of Market
    Depth of Market, aka the Order Book, is a window that shows how many open buy and sell orders there are at different prices for a security. Let’s say the current price is $1, the DOM will show how many orders there are at $0.90, $1.05, etc. It’s a great tool to see where the supply and demand(...)
  • Dividend
    A dividend is a payment made by a corporation to its shareholders, usually as a distribution of profits.[1] When a corporation earns a profit or surplus, it can re-invest it in the business (called retained earnings), and pay a fraction of the profit as a dividend to shareholders. Distribution(...)
  • DOM
    Depth of Market, aka the Order Book, is a window that shows how many open buy and sell orders there are at different prices for a security. Let’s say the current price is $1, the DOM will show how many orders there are at $0.90, $1.05, etc. It’s a great tool to see where the supply and demand(...)
  • Dovish
    Definition of Dovish. Refers to the tone of language used to describe a situation and the associated implications for actions. For example, if the Federal Reserve bank refers to inflation in a dovish tone, it is unlikely that they would take aggressive actions. 
  • e

  • Economic Indicator
    A statistic that indicates current economic growth and stability issued by the government or a non-government institution (i.e. Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Employement Rates, Trade Deficits, Industrial Production, and Business Inventories).
  • Economy
    For other uses, see Economy (disambiguation). An economy (From Greek οίκος – "household" and νέμoμαι – "manage") is an area of the production, distribution, or trade, and consumption of goods and services by different agents in a given geographical location. Understood in its broadest sense,(...)
  • Emerging Markets
     
  • ETF
    An exchange-traded fund (ETF) is an investment fund traded on stock exchanges, much like stocks.[1][2] An ETF holds assets such as stocks, commodities, or bonds, and trades close to its net asset value over the course of the trading day. Most ETFs track an index, such as a stock index or bond(...)
  • Exchange Traded Fund
    An exchange-traded fund (ETF) is an investment fund traded on stock exchanges, much like stocks.[1][2] An ETF holds assets such as stocks, commodities, or bonds, and trades close to its net asset value over the course of the trading day. Most ETFs track an index, such as a stock index or bond(...)
  • f

  • Fed
    The Federal Reserve System‍—‌also known as the Federal Reserve or simply the Fed‍—‌is the central banking system of the United States. It was created on December 23, 1913, with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act in response to a series of financial panics (particularly the panic of(...)
  • Federal Open Market Committee
    The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), a committee within the Federal Reserve System (the Fed), is charged under the United States law with overseeing the nation's open market operations (i.e., the Fed's buying and selling of United States Treasury securities). This Federal Reserve(...)
  • Federal Reserve System
    The Federal Reserve System‍—‌also known as the Federal Reserve or simply the Fed‍—‌is the central banking system of the United States. It was created on December 23, 1913, with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act in response to a series of financial panics (particularly the panic of(...)
  • FOMC
    The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), a committee within the Federal Reserve System (the Fed), is charged under the United States law with overseeing the nation's open market operations (i.e., the Fed's buying and selling of United States Treasury securities). This Federal Reserve(...)
  • g

  • GDP
    Gross Domestic Product (GDP) measures the total value of all goods and services produced by the economy. A rising trend has a positive effect on the nation's currency. GDP is the broadest measure of activity and the primary gauge of the economy's health. To foreign investors, a strong economy(...)
  • h

  • Hawkish
    An aggressive tone. For example, if the Federal Reserve uses hawkish language to describe the threat of inflation, one could reasonably expect stronger actions from the Fed. There is a similar application to CEO describing an important issue that a firm faces. Opposite of Dovish.Describing(...)
  • i

  • Inauguration
    An inauguration is a formal ceremony or special event to mark either:the beginning of a major public leader's term of office. the opening or first public use of a new civic area, organisation or project. Such as a museum, hospital or film studio.[1]The term, in a less formal(...)
  • Inflation
    An economic condition whereby prices for consumer goods rise, eroding purchasing power.
  • iShares
    iShares are a family of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) managed by BlackRock. The first iShares were known as WEBS but were since rebranded.[citation needed]Each iShares fund tracks a bond or stock market index. The following stock exchanges list iShares funds: London Stock Exchange, American(...)
  • n

  • NFP
    Nonfarm payroll employment is a compiled name for goods, construction and manufacturing companies in the US. It does not include farm workers, private household employees, or non-profit organization employees.It is an influential statistic and economic indicator released monthly by the(...)
  • Nonfarm payrolls
    Nonfarm payroll employment is a compiled name for goods, construction and manufacturing companies in the US. It does not include farm workers, private household employees, or non-profit organization employees.It is an influential statistic and economic indicator released monthly by the(...)
  • o

  • OPEC
    Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC, /ˈoʊpɛk/ oh-pek, or OPEP in several other languages) is an intergovernmental organization of 14 nations, founded in 1960 in Baghdad by the first five members, and headquartered since 1965 in Vienna. As of 2015, the 14 countries accounted(...)
  • Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries
    Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC, /ˈoʊpɛk/ oh-pek, or OPEP in several other languages) is an intergovernmental organization of 14 nations, founded in 1960 in Baghdad by the first five members, and headquartered since 1965 in Vienna. As of 2015, the 14 countries accounted(...)
  • p

  • Pay per acquisition
    Cost per acquisition (CPA), also known as pay per acquisition (PPA) and cost per conversion, is an online advertising pricing model where the advertiser pays for each specified acquisition - for example, an impression, click, form submit (e.g., contact request, newsletter sign up, registration(...)
  • Penny stock
    Penny stocks, also known as cent stocks in some countries, are common shares of small public companies that trade at low prices per share.In the United States, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) defines a penny stock as a security that trades below $5-per-share, is not(...)
  • Percentage in point
    In finance, specifically in foreign exchange markets, a percentage in point or price interest point (pip) is a unit of change in an exchange rate of a currency pair. The major currencies (except the Japanese yen) are traditionally priced to four decimal places, and a pip is one unit of the(...)
  • Pip
    In finance, specifically in foreign exchange markets, a percentage in point or price interest point (pip) is a unit of change in an exchange rate of a currency pair. The major currencies (except the Japanese yen) are traditionally priced to four decimal places, and a pip is one unit of the(...)
  • Portfolio
    DefinitionThe term portfolio refers to any combination of financial risk such as stocks, bonds and cash. Portfolios may be held by individual investors and/or managed by financial professionals, hedge funds, banks and other financial institutions. It is a generally accepted principle that(...)
  • r

  • Real Estate Investment Trust
    A real estate investment trust (REIT) is a company that owns, and in most cases operates, income-producing real estate. REITs own many types of commercial real estate, ranging from office and apartment buildings to warehouses, hospitals, shopping centers, hotels and even timberlands. Some(...)
  • REIT
    A real estate investment trust (REIT) is a company that owns, and in most cases operates, income-producing real estate. REITs own many types of commercial real estate, ranging from office and apartment buildings to warehouses, hospitals, shopping centers, hotels and even timberlands. Some(...)
  • s

  • Shares
    "Shares" redirects here. For other uses, see Share (disambiguation). In financial markets, a share is a unit of account for various investments. It often means the stock of a corporation, but is also used for collective investments such as mutual funds, limited partnerships, andreal estate(...)
  • Short Position
    An investment position that benefits from a decline in market price.
  • Spread
    The difference between the bid (buy) and offer (sell) prices.
  • Sterling
    Slang for British Pound.
  • STK
    For "capital stock" in the sense of the fixed input of a production function, see Physical capital. For the goods and materials that a business holds, see Inventory. For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). The stock (also capital stock) of a corporation constitutes the equity stock of its(...)
  • Stock
    For "capital stock" in the sense of the fixed input of a production function, see Physical capital. For the goods and materials that a business holds, see Inventory. For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). The stock (also capital stock) of a corporation constitutes the equity stock of its(...)
  • Swap
    A currency swap is the simultaneous sale and purchase of the same amount of a given currency at a forward exchange rate.
  • u

  • Unemployment Rate
    The Unemployment Rate measures the percentage of the total work force that is unemployed and actively seeking employment during the previous quarter. A higher than expected reading should be taken as negative/bearish for the first currency of the appropriate currency pair, while a lower than(...)
  • United States presidential inauguration
    The inauguration of the President of the United States is a ceremony to mark the commencement of a new four-year term of a president of the United States. An inauguration ceremony takes place for each term of a president, even if the president continues in office for a second term. Since 1937,(...)
  • US Dollar Index - USDX
    A measure of the value of the U.S. dollar relative to majority of its most significant trading partners. This index is similar to other trade-weighted indexes, which also use the exchange rates from the same major currencies.
  • US Prime Rate
    The interest rate at which US banks will lend to their prime corporate customers
  • v

  • Vol
    Volatility is a statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given security or market index. Volatility can either be measured by using the standard deviation or variance between returns from that same security or market index. Commonly, the higher the volatility, the riskier the(...)
  • Volatility
    Volatility is a statistical measure of the dispersion of returns for a given security or market index. Volatility can either be measured by using the standard deviation or variance between returns from that same security or market index. Commonly, the higher the volatility, the riskier the(...)
  • y

  • Yield
    In finance, the term yield describes the amount in cash (in percentage terms) that returns to the owners of a security, in the form of interest or dividends received from the security. Normally, it does not include the price variations, distinguishing it from the total return. Yield applies to(...)